There are heaps of unusual places to stay if you're looking for a sustainable holiday in Wales. Many are off-grid too - ideal for a digital detox. Check in, leave your mobile phone turned off and… relax!

Yurts, tipis and treehouses

At Riverside camping near Caernarfon you can stay in a handcrafted tented lodge called a Caban on the banks of the gurgling river Seiont. Don't think you'll be roughing it either. They come with wood-fired hot tub and chimenea barbeque. They’re completely off-grid too.

Or how about a shepherd's hut? The Huts in the Hills sit snuggly in a woodland clearing in the Black Mountains. All three are off-grid and designed to have minimal environmental impact. Each has a wood burning stove and comfy bed. Wind turbine and solar panels provide power, while water's from a natural spring.

Camp Cynrig campsite is completely off-grid too, using solar for its power. You can choose from luxury tipis, bell tents and even a cosy cabin made using mainly recycled materials. It's moments from the foothills of Pen y Fan in the heart of the wildly beautiful Brecon Beacons National Park.

A woman reading a book in the doorway of a shepherd's hut.
Campers round a campfire by a stream.

Relaxing at the Huts in the Hills, near Hay-on-Wye

The wood to build the decks for the five comfy yurts at Hidden Valley Yurts came from their own forest! They're set in 80 acres of secluded woodland in south Wales with solar power, spring water and composting toilets. What's particularly cool is their links with local ecology students who help monitor the health of the wildlife.

Fancy something more lux? The lodges at Sloeberry Farm are super comfy. Recycled materials like industrial cable reels and scaffolding boards have been used to build funky bed decks above cool kitchens and bathrooms sheltered by huge canvas roofs. There are comfy armchairs, log burning stoves and wood-fired hot tubs.

Or how about taking to the trees? As well as Hobbit houses and yurts, Florence Springs has treehouses with slides for getting back down to ground! They also have private gardens, wood-burning hot tubs and fully equipped outdoor kitchens. Sustainability is a high priority with composting loos and solar lighting.

A tree house with hot tub, slide and swing seat.
A yurt from above with a hot tub and outside seating.

A tree house and yurt at Florence Springs Glamping near Tenby, Pembrokeshire

Islands, cottages and eco-homes

You don't have to limit yourself to glamping. Increasing numbers of holiday cottages in Wales are super-sustainable too.

Crashpad Lodges has to be one of the most isolated spots to stay in Wales, hidden deep inside Snowdonia National Park. This restored farmhouse is completely off-grid using solar and wind for heat, light and to pump water. You can't even drive to the house. They bring you the last kilometre by 4x4 to keep disturbance of the land to a minimum.

Or how about living on an island? Lovely Skomer Island is a wildlife hotspot particularly good for twitchers with throngs of puffins and Manx Shearwaters in residence. You often see seals and dolphins off shore. The old farm has been converted into cosy accommodation and has won awards for sustainability.

If state of the art modern living is your thing, try the Eco House in lovely Honddu valley, close to Brecon. An architect-designed passive house it's super efficient. The vast expanses of windows and airy living spaces will lift your spirits as well.

And for the best of new tech and old right next to each other Cynfal Farm Cottages features heating by biomass boiler, hydroelectricity and electric car charging points. But you’re also next to a halt for the steam-hauled Talyllyn Railway. Stay somewhere cutting edge for sustainable living then hop on one of the oldest forms of public transport to get into town.

Learn a little whilst you’re with us

With Wales being such a hotspot for sustainable travel, you can do all sorts of courses and experiences here too.

The Centre for Alternative Technology was promoting sustainability years before the rest of us caught up. Visit for a day and see eco-ideas in practice with a focus on learning for kids: renewable energy, organic farming, eco-friendly construction and more are showcased. There are also short courses on topics like rewilding, social forestry, wind generation, composting toilets and growing fruit.

The organic gardens and the WISE building, Centre for Alternative Technology.

The WISE (Wales Institute for Sustainable Education) Building at the Centre for Alternative Technology near Machynlleth. 

At Penhein Glamping – near Chepstow you can combine a stay in luxurious alachigh tents with courses that include foraging for the table, making perfumes and (our favourite) making gin. You also can learn bushcraft, campfire cooking or even try the ancient Japanese tradition of forest bathing.

Penhein ‘alachigh’ tent nestled woodland.
Double bed in a glamping dome.
Young children building a shelter from wood.

Alachigh tents and learning bushcraft at Penhein Glamping

Gin making is on offer at Top of the Woods in Penrallt too. There are bushcraft sessions, campfire story sessions, yoga and a chance to meet the friendly Kune Kune piggies and learn how to keep and care for them.

The Denmark Farm Conservation Centre is another real centre of excellence for sustainable living and learning. This unique conservation project is focussed on restoring the biodiversity of farmland. Along with a host of accommodation options there are courses in willow weaving, hedge laying, fermented foods, habitat surveying, and sustainable power generation.

The Ceridwen Centre in Carmarthenshire has top notch eco-creds too. Courses cover yoga, crafting, reflexology, wild food and foraging and cooking with seaweed. There's even a reward scheme for visitors who show particularly strong recycling skills!

Students looking at grasses and flowers in a field.
Timber framed eco lodge at Denmark Farm.
A wooden hut by a lake.

Students participating on an Ecology course, the Eco Lodge and the lakeside shelter at Denmark Farm

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