We asked some of the staff at Ramblers Cymru, the representative body for walkers in Wales, to share their favourite autumn walks in Wales. The team strives to promote walking and develop path networks in Wales, and there are very few routes they haven't walked in this country, so their recommendations are to be trusted!

Hen Felin Wynt, Llantrisant, RCT

3.8 miles – Chosen by Olie Wicks, Walking Spaces Officer for Ramblers Cymru 

The Hen Felin Wynt community walk forms part of a series of circular walks in the Llantrisant area known as the Bunny Walks (it is number four in the series). The route starts in Cross Inn and immediately takes you into rolling countryside with fine views out towards Creigiau Woods and the Rhondda Valley. You soon pass through Llantrisant Common before heading up to Hen Felin Wynt, an old windmill. It offers amazing views of Miskin Woods and Mynydd Garth Maelwg, where the autumn colours should be in full bloom.

A woman and a dog walking above Llantrisant.
Walking near Llantrisant

Brechfa Forest, Abergorlech, Carmarthenshire

1-5 miles – Chosen by James Williams of Lampeter Ramblers

The Abergorlech walks in Brechfa Forest are run by Natural Resources Wales. In autumn, walkers can immerse themselves in a woodland that showcases trees from all over the world. The forest offers a series of walks for all abilities as well as mountain bike routes. The beautiful rivers Gorlech and Cothi run nearby. 

Coed Rheidol National Nature Reserve, Devil's Bridge, Ceredigion

Various distance options – Chosen by Olie Wicks

Starting from Devil's Bridge railway station to access the reserve, this route follows part of stage 11 of the Cambrian Way hiking trail. Having walked up the road away from the station, you descend through pretty woodland to cross the Afon Rheidol and head into the valley bottom. As you climb the other side of the valley, epic views open up over the river and surrounding woods. This is a linear walk, but you could continue along the Cambrian Way trail (a hiking trail covering all of Wales from Cardiff Castle to Conwy Castle) or walk back to the railway station. 

River and woodland views along the Cambrian Way walking trail.
Views across woodland on the Cambrian Way hiking trail.
Views along the Cambrian Way hiking trail in the Rheidol Valley

Woodlands, Park & Coast, Barry, Vale of Glamorgan

3.5-5.5 miles – Chosen by Rebecca Brough, Policy & Advocacy Manager for Ramblers Cymru

This Valeways Millennium Heritage Trail walk is full of variety. It has a great mix of coastal views, shaded woodland, formal parks and a bit of local history thrown in. Canine pals will be glad to hear that it makes a decent dog walk too; there is plenty to keep snuffling noses interested and the woodland streams and beach offer a watery option for hounds who like a dip! There are also some lovely independent cafes on the route for a quick refreshment stop.

Walk up Cnicht from Croesor Circuit, Croesor, Gwynedd & Snowdonia

6.5 miles – Chosen by Brân Devey, Comms & Engagement Manager for Ramblers Cymru

Cnicht from Croesor is commonly known as the Welsh Matterhorn. This fairly challenging route gets the blood pumping and the heart swooning for its panoramic views of the Snowdonia landscape. On a crisp autumn day, this route provides colourful leaves in the woodland, undulating frost-bitten hills and beautiful views of the Welsh coast. 

Signpost and gate leading to the Cnicht footpath.
Views near Cnicht.
Cnicht from Croesor walk, Snowdonia

Waunfawr to Rhyd Ddu, Gwynedd & Snowdonia

11 miles – Chosen by Paula Renzel, Paths for People Advocate for Ramblers Cymru

This is a particularly spectacular section of the Snowdonia Slate Trail, following Section 4 and Section 5. It starts with a steep ascent through the forest just outside of Waunfawr, taking you over some little-frequented moorland with stunning panoramic views of Snowdon, Bardsay Island and Anglesey, the Llŷn Peninsula , Mynydd Mawr, and the Nantlle Ridge.

After passing through Y Fron, the route takes you through the impressive remains of Dorothea Quarry, where up to 350 miners were employed at any one time between the 1820s and 1970 when it closed. From there, you drop into the Nantlle Valley and closely follow the line of the lake and river, with views on Mynydd Mawr from the other side. The last section of the route takes you up over the hill and down through a forest into Rhyd Ddu.

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