Now into its teens, the annual Sŵn Festival has undergone some changes since it launched in 2007, but remains at the heart of the city's music offering. If your idea of a good time is nipping in between multiple cosy music venues across the city, grabbing the odd pint here and there and watching some of the best local and national rising stars, then this is the festival for you.

The three-day festival takes place over one weekend in the autumn, where a handful of venues open their doors to all-day events, showcasing new music, emerging acts and homegrown artists. It was founded by former BBC Radio 1 DJ Huw Stephens and music promoter Jon Rostron, with the aim of celebrating and supporting new music coming in and out of Wales. While the line-up is peppered with lesser-known names, the live experiences always excite.

People in the crowd at a busy concert

Sŵn Festival 2018, Cardiff, South Wales

For me, Sŵn has always been about the smaller events that take place around the headline events. It's about wandering up and down Womanby Street (the symbolic home for most of the action), bumping into people you haven't seen for ages, striking up conversations with friendly strangers, and starting mosh pits in the street because the venue you want to get into is full, the band are in full flow and the queue is already up the street and round the corner.

Over the years, fringe events have supported the music schedule. These have included quizzes, cabaret, themed karaoke, a running club and industry mixers.

For more information about Sŵn Festival and to get updates on what's coming up, visit the official Sŵn Festival website or follow Sŵn Festival on Twitter - @SwnFestivalFacebook - @SwnFestival or Instagram - @swnfestival.

Curious to hear what performers have played Sŵn Festival in the past, or want to relive an audio experience? Check out the official Sŵn Festival Spotify page for playlists.

Musicians playing at SŴN Festival
female playing guitar and singing.

Sŵn Festival 2016, Cardiff, South Wales

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