Take a look around

Bedwellty House from Above
Bedwellty House from Above
Tredegar
1 / 8
The Long Shelter
The Long Shelter
Tredegar
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The Band Stand
The Band Stand
Tredegar
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The Ice House
The Ice House
Tredegar
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The Grotto
The Grotto
Tredegar
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Block of Coal
Block of Coal
Tredegar
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The Council Chamber
The Council Chamber
Tredegar
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The Majestic Hallway
The Majestic Hallway
Tredegar
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About Bedwellty House & Park

Bedwellty House and Park has a long and fascinating history, much of which can be viewed during your visit, including the Council Chambers where Aneurin Bevan discussed the forming of the National Health Service. The house and its surround parkland have been refurbished to a high level and it is the perfect place to visit with family and friends. It is a popular wedding venue, providing the perfect backdrop for that special day.

It was a beautiful wooded area typical of estates of the gentry in the nineteenth century. However, in 1899 it was rumoured that the Tredegar Company was to relinquish its lease on Bedwellty House that had always been leased for its managers. Lord Tredegar confirmed that this was the case. The Town Council expressed a desire to buy the estate as a public park for the town. Alderman Henry Bowen who led the deputation was prepared to pay a fair price and was surprised when he was told that they could have the park for the residents of Tredegar and the House as a Council Chamber, free of charge (except for a short strip on the Park Row side). Rev Alfred Barrett, Chairman to the Council, signed the agreement on 23rd October 1900. The park was opened to the public in November informally but was officially opened on 18th April 1901.

Much work has been carried out by succeeding Town Councils over the years to accommodate the people of Tredegar. The long shelter was built in 1910; inside the long shelter, a mosaic was placed in the memory of the local Chartist movement. The bandstand was built in 1912. The cenotaph was placed in the park in 1924. The swimming pool,(open air) was a very welcome addition in 1932 as was the hard tennis court in the same year.
The Grounds from Above
The Grounds from Above
The WW2 memorial gates were erected in 1951 and, in the following year, the circular gardens and statues in front of Bedwellty House were formed.

The park is now, and has been for many years, a place of beauty and provides a place of relaxation for the general public. The outdoor swimming pool has been closed (there is now an indoor pool at the nearby sports centre). The park has many different varieties of trees and plants which are maintained with the help of a group of local volunteers - the Friends of Bedwellty House and Park - including a new sensory garden. There are several duck ponds and many beautiful walks and the park is home to the largest piece of coal in the UK.

At the rear of Bedwellty House, stands the Ice House one of the few surviving of its kind.

The bandstand has recently been refurbished in its original style and, throughout the summer, free concerts are hosted and perfectly complemented with refreshments purchased at Bedwellty House's cafe.

Inside Bedwellty House there is much memorabilia to be found including a marble bust of Viscount Tredegar by Sir Gascombe John and a bust of Aneurin Bevan. There is a casket of earth brought home from Tredegar Hill in Burma (WW2) plus a book of remembrance from both world wars. There are also many more artefacts to be found there.

Location

51.79269, -3.17294478

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NOTE: The above information is generated by third-party data provided by Bedwellty House & Park. © Bedwellty House & Park 2022.

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